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Snap Language

Getting Smarter through Language

Lesson 1. Verbs and Prepositions (Basic, A1 Level):
believe, feel, give, keep, know, leave, look, say, talk, think

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• believe, believe in

”To believe” (no preposition) means you trust a person or you believe that something is true or correct.

”To believe in” means you think something is real or exists. You express that you trust someone can do something.

Examples: believe
  • John says he is rich. I believe him him because he has a large house and two expensive cars.
  • Pedro says he can run a mile in 5 minutes. I don’t believe him.
  • I believe it’s time to leave.
Examples: believe in
  • Do you believe in ghosts?
  • They believe in the power of cooperation.
  • They believe in hard work.
  • I believe in being kind to others.
  • Try again. I believe in you!
 

• feel, feel for, feel about

You can use “feel” as a linking verb, which works just like the verb “be” (for example, “I am tired,” or “I feel tired). You can also use it with different prepositions with different meanings.

”To feel for” someone means you are sorry for them.

You can also say, for example, “I feel bad about the accident.” Then you are expressing your feelings or emotions toward something (or someone).

You can also say, for example, “I feel bad about

Examples: feel
  • Feel the baby’s forehead. If it’s hot, she may have a fever .
  • Feel this sweater. It’s very soft.
 

Examples: feel for
  • John studies very hard, but his grades are terrible. I feel bad for him.
  • Anna is crying because she can’t find her cat. I feel for her.
  • Patricia is doing very well in school. I feel happy for her.
Examples: feel about
  • The new president is great. How do you feel about him?
  • Marisa feels unsure about her decision.
  • How do you feel about the exam next week? Are you well prepared?

• give to

You can say, for example, “Give me the book” or “Give the book to me.

Examples: give
  • Are you going to give your girlfriend these flowers?
  • I want to give my mother a card on Mother’s Day.
  • Give the children some money for so they can buy ice cream.
 

Examples: give to
  • Are you going to give these flowers to your girlfriend?
  • I want to give a card to my mother on Mother’s Day.
  • Give some money to the children so they can buy ice cream.
 

• keep, keep from, keep to

”Keep” usually has no preposition, and it has multiple meanings (for example, continue having, continue holding, stay, and so on).

To “keep someone from doing something” means you stop them from doing it. They cannot do it because of something.

To “keep to” something means to do something by following a rule, standard, schedule, or way.

Examples: keep
  • What are you doing with your old shoes? Are you going to keep them?
  • Don’t stop. Keep going.
  • I need a new doctor. My doctor sometimes keeps me waiting for hours.
Examples: keep (someone) from (doing something)
  • The neighbors’ party is keeping George from falling asleep.
  • The rain will keep people from going to the game.
  • Nothing will keep me from going to your birthday party this weekend!
  • Pedro is always late for dinner because his boss keeps him from leaving work on time.
 

Examples: keep to
  • Drive carefully. Keep to the speed limit.
  • Some vegans keep to a very strict diet of plants.
  • Students must keep to their schedule during the semester.
  • Sleep is important. You should keep to your bedtime every day.
 

• know, know about

To “know” someone means you you have met that person before. You are familiar with the person. It can also mean that you understand something well.

You “know” about someone or something means you understand or have information about a person or topic. You have information in your mind.

Examples: know
  • I know someone who speaks 8 languages.
  • Do you know Mr. Smith?
  • Maria knows the name of the capitals of all American states.
  • It is important to know geography. It helps you understand the world better.
  • Do you know how to drive?
Examples: know about
  • This book has everything you need to know about animals.
  • I don’t know very much about this country.
  • What do you know about computers?
  • What do you know about the new boss?

• leave, leave for

When you leave, you leave one place for another place. The preposition “for” gives you the destination.

Examples: leave
  • What time do you leave work every day?
  • Many Americans never leave the United States their whole lives.
  • Emilio is leaving his job at the end of the month.
Examples: leave for (someplace)
  • It’s almost 5. I need to leave for class.
  • What time are you leaving for the party this evening?
  • I need to leave for the airport at 7 tomorrow.
Using both in the same sentence

You can use “leave” without and with the preposition to show the starting point (no preposition) and the destination (with “from”) at the same time.

  • Emilio is leaving his job for a better one at the end of the month.
  • I need to leave home for the airport at 7 tomorrow.
  • When are you leaving the United States for France?

• look at, look for, look like

To “look at” someone or something means you are directing your eyes to that person or thing.

To “look for” someone or something means you are trying to find that person or thing.

When two people look very similar, you say one person looks like the other.

Examples: look at
  • In some countries, you must look at people in the eyes when you talk to them.
  • I love looking at pictures on Instagram.
  • What are you looking at?
Examples: look for
  • My rent is too high. I’m looking for a new apartment.
  • I can’t find my glasses. Can you help me look for them?
  • If you see John, tell him I’m looking for him.
Examples: look like
  • Look at that cloud! It looks like an animal.
  • Do you look like your father or your mother?
  • That cat looks like a tiger.
 

• say to, say about

You say something (no preposition) to someone. You can say “John said goodbye.” If you want to include a person, you use the preposition “to” as in “He said goodbye to his friends.”

You also say something about a topic or subject.

Examples: say to
  • Remember to say hello to everyone when you arrive.
  • What are you going to say to John?
  • I don’t want to say anything to him. He may get angry.
Examples: say about
  • What are you going to say to John about the party?
  • Don’t say anything to him about the party. I don’t want him to come.
  • Listen! The teacher is saying something about tomorrow’s test.

Assess Your Learning

Practice 1. Fill in the blanks using the correct prepositions after the verbs in this lesson.

Practice 2. Complete sentences using the verbs and prepositions in this lesson.

Congratulations on completing this lesson!

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There are many more preposition lessons!

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Snap Language supporters make the creation of these materials possible.

Learn how you can support our work, get perks, and help us continue creating high-quality materials.

You can support us by simply white-listing this site.