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Dropping Prepositions of Time

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In the previous lessons you saw how to use prepositions with days, weeks, and months. You also saw the prepositions you need with prepositions with exact times and periods, and prepositions with holidays and celebrations.

You saw that sometimes you do not use the preposition or you can drop the preposition. Let’s look at those situations.

No Preposition with Tomorrow, Tonight, Yesterday, Next, or Last

See the examples below.

Tomorrow and yesterday do not take a preposition

  • I stayed home yesterday.
  • What are you planning to do tomorrow?

No Preposition with next or last

Compare the following pairs of sentence:

  • What are you planning to do on Saturday.
  • What are you planning to do next Saturday?
  • I woke up early in the morning yesterday.
  • I woke up early yesterday morning.
  • I went to a party on Saturday.
  • I went to a party last Saturday.

Other Expressions

Drop the preposition when you use

  • this and
  • every,

Drop the preposition with time expressions containing “the:”

  • the following,
  • the previous,
  • the day before yesterday,
  • and similar expressions.

Compare these example sentences

Examples 1.

  • Let’s watch a movie on Saturday.
  • Let’s watch a movie on the weekend.
  • Let’s watch a movie this Saturday.
  • Let’s watch a movie this weekend.
  • Let’s watch a movie the day after tomorrow.

Examples 2.

  • Where were you on Christmas?
    (on that day)
  • Where were you last Christmas? (no preposition)
  • Where will you be next Christmas?(no preposition)

Dropping “On” with Day of the Week and Dates

You can use “on” with days and dates or drop the preposition.

Compare these example sentences

Example 1.

  • My birthday is on September 3.
  • My birthday is September 3.

Example 2.

  • What are you planning to do on Saturday?
  • What are you planning to do Satuday?

Example 3.

  • Valentine’s Day is on February 14 every year.
  • Valentine’s Day is February 14 every year.

ATTENTION! You must use a preposition with holidays.

  • I was in New York City on Valentine’s Day last year.
  • We have a day off on Christmas.

Of course, you must drop the preposition if you use, for example, “this” with days.

  • I have to go to work on Saturday.
  • I have to go to work Saturday.
  • But you must drop the preposition in

  • I have to go to work this Saturday.

Practice

Complete a short exercise to assess what you have learned.

Back to Catalog Prepositions List