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Prepositions with Days, Months, and Years

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In English, you use certain prepositions to show the day, month, and year (for example, on Tuesday, in January, in 2025).

There is no clear explanation why you use different prepositions, but there are some general rules. The best way to learn which preposition to use is to use them frequently until it becomes natural.

Use “On” with Days

Use on with days of the week (e.g., on Sunday, on Monday, and so on).

Use on with days of the month (e.g., on the 1st, on the 25th, and so on).

To make the day more exact, you can add the month to it. You are still talking about a specific day, so you use the preposition on (for example, on January 1, on September 25, and so on ).

To make the day very exact, you include all the information. It is still a day so you use on (for example, on April 3, 2025, or on Monday, December 15, 2025).

Example sentences

  • I have English classes on Mondays and Wednesdays.
  • I always visit my grandparents on Sundays.
  • I was born on January 5.
  • World War I started on September 1, 1939.
  • On July 4, 1776, the United States became independent from Great Britain.
  • Kathy was born on Friday, July 3, 1998.

Use “In” with Months and Years

When talking about months, use the preposition in (for example, in January).

When talking about years, use in (for example, in 1990).

(Remember: If you add the day to the month, it is not a month anymore but a day in that month.)

Example sentences

With the month:

  • In the Northern Hemisphere, winter starts in December.
  • Many people travel to Florida in January and February.
  • My classes start in September.
  • In July and August, it’s very hot in Texas.
  • We moved to Colorado in April 2020.

With the year:

  • We moved here in 2020.
  • The United States became independent from Great Britain in 1776.
  • Kathy was born in 1998.

Practice

Instructions. Write down the sentences below. Use the correct preposition to complete the blank (___).

When you are ready, click “Check answers” to see the correct answers.

  1. I like to go to the beach blank Saturdays.
  2. Do you go to school blank Saturdays?
  3. My best friend is moving to Japan blank August. He’s leaving blank August 20.
  4. Don’t forget to call your mother blank her birthday.
  5. The course starts blank Monday, September 3.
  6. Albert Einstein was born blank 1879.
  7. The United States became independent blank 1776, but the Constitution was signed 11 years later, blank September 17, 1787.
  8. What are you going to do blank New Year’s Day?
  9. Where were you blank Christmas Day 2020.
  10. In the story, the character was born blank a Sunday blank 1886.

  1. I like to go to the beach on Saturdays.
  2. Do you go to school on Saturdays?
  3. My best friend is moving to Japan in August. He’s leaving on August 20.
  4. Don’t forget to call your mother on her birthday.
  5. The course starts on Monday, September 3.
  6. Albert Einstein was born in1879.
  7. The United States became independent in 1776, but the Constitution was signed on September 17, 1787.
  8. What are you going to do on New Year’s Day?
  9. What were you on Christmas Day 2020?
    (This has the year, but you are still talking about a specific day in 2020, so you need the preposition “on.”)
  10. In the story, the character was born on a Sunday in 1886.
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