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Personal Pronouns (All Cases) | (A-Level, Basic)

Summary of Main Personal Pronouns and Possessive Determiners

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Summary Table

Person Singular Plural
Subject I, you, he, she, it we, you (you all), they
Object me, you, him, her, it us, you, them
Possessive (determiner) my, your, his, her, its our, your, their
Possessive (pronoun) mine, yours, his, hers, — ours, yours, theirs
Reflexive myself, yourself, himself, herself, itself ourselves, yourselves, themselves

First, Second, and Third Person

In grammar, the pronouns can be first, second, and third person. Pronouns are also singular or plural when they refer to one person (I, you, he, she, it) or two or more people (we, you, they).

First person pronouns singular and plural are “I” and “we." The first person refers to the person or persons speaking.

 

The second person pronoun “you” is both singular and plural. The second person refers to the person you are speaking to.

Third person pronouns are both singular (”he,” “she,” “it”) and plural (”they”). The third person refers to the person you and I are talking about.

Case

Pronouns have different grammatical functions in the sentence. These are called the grammatical case of the pronoun: Subject, object, possessive, and reflexive.

Subject

The subject is the person or thing doing something or acting on the verb. You call this the subjective or nominative case.

Subjective pronouns

I

you

he, she, it

we

you, you all

they

Examples

We are learning English.

Do you speak English?

He speaks French, and she speaks Italian.

Object

The object is receives the action or effect expressed by the verb. The objective case is also called the accusative (direct object) and dative (indirect object) cases.

The object case is used after prepositions (after me, unlike her, beneath us).

Objective pronouns

me

you

him, her, it

we

you

they

Examples

Please give me that box.

Please give it to me.

John speaks to us only in English.

Possessive

Possessive Determiners

Possessive determiners (my, your, her, their) indicate that someone has or owns something. They can also show a relationship or association between people (for example, “my friend" or “my head").

Determiners are not true pronouns, but they work similarly.

Possessive determiners

my

your

his, her, its

our

your

their

Examples

This is my house.

Joanne and her husband are from California..

The children and their friends are playing soccer.

 

Possessive Pronouns

Possessive pronouns (mine, yours, hers, theirs) are true pronouns as they replace nouns. They show ownership (my car – mine), a relationship (her husband – hers), or an association (our hair – ours).

Possessive pronouns

mine

yours

his, hers, —

ours

yours

theirs

Examples

John’s dog is brown. Mine is black. (mine = my dog)

Are those pencils mine or yours? (my pencils or your pencils)

— Are these your parents’ books?
— No. These are mine. Those over there are theirs.
( mine = my books; theirs = their books)

Reflexive pronouns (Object)

Reflexive pronouns (myself, yourself, yourselves, themselves) show that the subject and the object of the sentence refer to the same person.

Reflexive pronouns can also be used to mean you do something alone or without any help (for example, “Students must complete their work themselves so that they can learn.”)

Reflexive pronouns

myself

yourself

himself, herself, itself

ourselves

yourselves

themselves

Examples using reflexive pronouns

I am buying myself a book.

John and Susan drive themselves to work every morning.

That knife is very sharp! Don’t cut yourself on it.

 

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