Snap Language

Getting Smarter through Language

“There is” or “there are?” (with other verbs) | Practice 2

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Based on the previous lesson and video, complete the blanks in each of the sentences below so that the correct form of there to be is used with the other verbs given in parentheses. Be sure to follow standard grammar rather than colloquial use.

When you are finished, click “Answer.”

Note. Your answers will not be submitted. When you leave this page, they will be deleted.

Example item

1. Juding from the number of empty glasses everywhere, (there be / must) a lot of people at the party last night.

Judging from the number of empty glasses everywhere, there must have been a lot of people at the party last night.

2. As a result of the rule changes, (there be / seem) a great deal of confusion among the players and fans of the game.

As a result of the rule changes, there seems to be a great deal of confusion among the players and fans of the game.

3. For an organization to work smoothly, (there be / have to) a consistent set of rules that everyone can follow.

For an organization to work smootly, there has to be a consistent set of rules that everyone can follow.

4. In a healthy relationship, (there be / must / often) a great deal of compromise between partners to prevent trivial problems from turning into serious ones.

In a healthy relationship, there must often be a great deal of compromise between partners to prevent trivial problems from turning into serious ones.

5. This is too complicated! (there be / have to) an easier way to do it.

This is too complicated! There has to be an easier way to do it.

6. Company survey results suggest that employees may be getting increasingly frustrated with the new manager. (there be / seem) a need for change in the way she treats her staff.

Company survey results suggest that employees may be getting increasingly frustrated with the new manager. There seems to be a need for change in the way she treats her staff.

7. Sorry. (there be / appear) a mistake in your application.

Sorry. There appears to be a mistake in your application.

8. — Professor Ecks, you have given me a failing grade on my last essay. (there be / have to) a mistake.

— Indeed! (there be / must) a glitch in the online gradebook when I entered your grade.

— Professor Ecks, you have given me a failing grade on my last essay. There has to be a mistake.

— Indeed! There must have been a glitch in the online gradebook when I entered your grade.

9. Not all scientists agree with this explanation. They believe (there be / have to) other factors involved that we have not found yet.

Not all scientists agree with this explanation. They believe there have to be other factors involved that we have not found yet.